Maryland Board of Public Works Approves $9.1 Million Grant to WSSC Water to Help Protect Local Waterways and the Chesapeake Bay

Grant Provides Funding for WSSC Water to Replace and Rehabilitate Sewer Mains and Manholes in Prince George’s County

| News Release

OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Maryland’s Largest Utility Has Invested More Than $1 Billion Since 2005 to Upgrade and Improve its Wastewater Collection System

Laurel, Md. – September 2, 2020 – The Maryland Board of Public Works (BPW) today approved two Bay Restoration Fund Grants totaling $9,154,250 to help fund WSSC Water’s Sewer Reconstruction Program. The comprehensive program replaces and rehabilitates pipes and manholes in areas where sewer mains leak, have become damaged or have reached the end of their useful life.

Specifically, the $9.1 million will be targeted to improve infrastructure in the Northeast and Lower Anacostia sewer basins, both located in Prince George’s County. They are two of 29 major sewer basins in the WSSC Water service area.

“These critical funds will allow us to continue our efforts to protect the environment and public health by upgrading our aging and damaged sewer infrastructure,” said WSSC Water General Manager and CEO Carla A. Reid. “We thank BPW members for approving this important grant and appreciate the Maryland Department of the Environment’s ongoing support of our clean-water mission.”

The Northeast sewer basin follows the Northeast Branch Watershed in northern Prince George’s County and serves portions of Greenbelt, New Carrolton, Riverdale, Beltsville and College Park. It contains more than 297 miles of sewer mains ranging from six  to 84 inches in diameter. The Lower Anacostia sewer basin follows the Anacostia River Watershed in central Prince George’s County and serves portions of Bladensburg, Brentwood, Hyattsville, and Mt. Rainier. This basin contains more than 75 miles of sewer mains ranging from six to 102 inches in diameter.

WSSC Water’s sewer system is a modern sanitary system - meaning the pipes that carry sewage from homes and businesses to water resource recovery facilities are separate from the storm water drainage system. Since 2005, WSSC Water has invested more than $1 billion to upgrade and improve its wastewater collection system in an effort to reduce sanitary sewer overflows throughout a nearly 1,000 square-mile service area.

These two Bay Restoration Fund Grants will help fund work that began in spring 2020. WSSC Water has been actively working to replace and rehabilitate pipes and manholes in these two sewer basins for years and progress will continue as maintenance needs are identified.

WSSC Water is the proud provider of safe, seamless and satisfying water services, making the essential possible every day for our neighbors in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties. We work to deliver our best because it’s what our customers expect and deserve.

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